Acceptance testing in software testing pdf

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The test environment is usually designed to be identical, or as close as possible, to the acceptance testing in software testing pdf production environment. UAT and OAT test cases are ideally derived in collaboration with business customers, business analysts, testers, and developers.

It’s essential that these tests include both business logic tests as well as operational environment conditions. As the test conditions successfully achieve their acceptance criteria, the stakeholders are reassured the development is progressing in the right direction. The acceptance test suite may need to be performed multiple times, as all of the test cases may not be executed within a single test iteration. The acceptance test suite is run using predefined acceptance test procedures to direct the testers which data to use, the step-by-step processes to follow and the expected result following execution. The actual results are retained for comparison with the expected results. If the actual results match the expected results for each test case, the test case is said to pass.

If the quantity of non-passing test cases does not breach the project’s predetermined threshold, the test suite is said to pass. If it does, the system may either be rejected or accepted on conditions previously agreed between the sponsor and the manufacturer. The objective is to provide confidence that the developed product meets both the functional and non-functional requirements. UAT as one of the final stages of a project often occurs before a client or customer accepts the new system. Users of the system perform tests in line with what would occur in real-life scenarios. It is important that the materials given to the tester be similar to the materials that the end user will have. Testers should be given real-life scenarios such as the three most common or difficult tasks that the users they represent will undertake.

The UAT acts as a final verification of the required business functionality and proper functioning of the system, emulating real-world conditions on behalf of the paying client or a specific large customer. If the software works as required and without issues during normal use, one can reasonably extrapolate the same level of stability in production. UAT should be executed against test scenarios. Test scenarios usually differ from System or Functional test cases in that they represent a “player” or “user” journey. The broad nature of the test scenario ensures that the focus is on the journey and not on technical or system-specific details, staying away from “click-by-click” test steps to allow for a variance in users’ behaviour. This test takes place before installation of the equipment. Most of the time testers not only check that the equipment meets the specification, but also that it is fully functional.

The results of these tests give clients confidence in how the system will perform in production. There may also be legal or contractual requirements for acceptance of the system. The customer specifies scenarios to test when a user story has been correctly implemented. A story can have one or many acceptance tests, whatever it takes to ensure the functionality works. Acceptance tests are black-box system tests. Each acceptance test represents some expected result from the system. Customers are responsible for verifying the correctness of the acceptance tests and reviewing test scores to decide which failed tests are of highest priority.